Ratatouille

Classic ratatouille is a robust Mediterranean stew of summer vegetables. We’ve adapted the dish, reducing the amount of oil, replacing the traditional eggplant with yellow squash and modifying the seasonings to come up with a savory topping for baked potatoes (or pasta). Serve as a hearty side dish or a light entree.

eliminated the butter
vegetable bouillon for regular chicken broth
eliminated Parmesan cheese
Before After
Calories 356 245
Fat (g.) 9 2.9
Calories from Fat 23% 10%
Cholesterol (mg.) 3 0

1 medium onion, cut lengthwise into thin strips
1 large sweet red or green pepper, seeded and cut into 1/4-by-2-inch strips
2 large garlic cloves, halved
2 teaspoons olive oil, preferably extra-virgin
5 1/2 cups julienned mixed zucchini and yellow squash
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves, divided
1 can (14 1/2 ounces) Italian (plum) tomatoes, with juice
1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste
3/4 cup vegetable bouillon
1 teaspoon mild honey, such as clover
1 1/2 teaspoons mild chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
5 large warm baked potatoes, halved lengthwise

In a 12-inch nonstick skillet, combine the onions, red or green peppers, garlic and oil. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes, or until the onions are limp and beginning to brown. Discard the garlic. Add the zucchini and squash and 1/4 cup of the parsley.

Cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes longer. Add the tomatoes (with juice). Break up the tomatoes with a spoon. In a small bowl, stir together the tomato paste, broth, honey, chili powder, paprika, marjoram and black pepper until well blended. Stir the mixture into the skillet. Adjust the heat so the mixture simmers gently.

Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender and the liquid has cooked down slightly. Stir in the salt (if using) and the remaining 1/4 cup parsley. Fluff the potato flesh with a fork, then spoon on the ratatouille.