Tag : cancer

How Drugs Get From the Test Tubes to Us, Part 2

“Do you want to participate in this trial, or another trial? Do you want to get the standard treatment? Or do you want to get no treatment at all? These are all valid, rational options,” Finn said. read more

Chromosome Breakage May Predict Cancer Risk

The sensitivity of an individual’s chromosomes to breakage by a cancer drug is largely inherited, say Dutch researchers.

The findings suggest that “a common genetic susceptibility to DNA damage can exist in the general population,” the team write in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. read more

Cancer Screening Research. Part 3

The combined technology has many applications, Zimmer says. For instance, it can help locate and photograph very small, but profound tumors and malformations.

“Sooner or later these have to be removed and they can be very tiny — a millimeter or less,” said Zimmer, who adds that the scan can help surgeons better pinpoint a target.

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Cancer Screening Research. Part 1

The Ultimate Treatment Is Catching It Early, Researchers Say

Just 20 years ago, leukemia, Hodgkin’s Disease and testicular cancer were devastating, often deadly diagnoses.

The advent of sophisticated cancer therapies and the promise of high-tech treatments such as stereotactic radiosurgery are extending lives and transforming once nearly untreatable cancers from death sentences into winnable wars.

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Testing for Colon Cancer

Q.My boyfriend’s father had colon cancer (not of the genetic variety). My boyfriend has had some inconsistencies with his bowel movements (urgency, diarrhea and constipation). read more

Worried about Hair Loss?

Losing your hair after chemotherapy treatment is quite common. The hair folicles weaken, therefore the hair falls out faster than usual.

Losing your hair after chemotherapy treatment is quite common. The hair folicles weaken, therefore the hair falls out faster than usual. Depending on the exact type of chemotherapy you have, hair loss starts anywhere between one to three weeks once your chemotherapy starts. Once the treatment is complete, you will notice your hair growing back. Sometimes it may not grow back just like it was before, people with curly hair have been known to have it grow back straight. Sometimes dark hair will grow back lighter. These changes are usually just temporary.
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